Mount Tabor Jubilee Wood

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Mount Tabor fields

JUBILEE WOOD AND THE MANY PATHWAYS IN THIS SMALL BUT INTERESTING AND BEAUTIFUL WALK AND NATURE RESERVE CREATED BY THE RESIDENTS OF LOWTON IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE WIGAN METRO.

Heading along A572 Newton Road in a direction from Newton to Lowton as you pass the Travellers Rest Public House on your right and pass Stone Cross Lane to your left a hundred yards or so on your left hand side you will see a bench and a public footpath sign.

This is Mount Tabor a patch of land part owned by Wigan Metro and part common land. This disused land has been developed into a valuable local public amenity as an outdoor space and nature reserve for local residents.     It’s a very pleasant walk with open views of the distant Horwich Moors and can be accessed from either Stone Cross Lane or Newton Road and is a rich and developing habitat for bird and insect life.

The site also contains the footings of a old workhouse (Mount Tabor) and hence has an historical interest aspect also.

Saplings (1 of 1)

NEW WOODLAND AND HABITAT FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS ONE OF THE SAPLING TREES PLANTED BY LOCAL RESIDENTS

Kathleen Johnson of Lane Head South Residents Group (L.H.S.R.G ) explains.

In   2012, (LHSRG). was granted a lease on one part of the land known as “Mount Tabor” , for the purpose of planting a woodland to mark the Diamond Jubilee of H.M. Queen Elizabeth 2nd.The lease was granted by the landowner, Wigan Metro and we were fortunate to have the support for our application , of local M.P. Andy Burnham.

Mount Tabor is situated between Newton Road and Stonecross Lane and has added interest in that part of the site was once occupied by a Victorian workhouse.

Residentsu (1 of 1)

LOCAL RESIDENTS DEVELOPING THE SITE LOCAL MP ANDY BURNHAM LENDS A HAND

November 2012 found us planting a hundred and five native British trees, mainly a mix of Birch, Hawthorn, Rowan, Hornbeam, Field Maple and Guelder Rose, obtained through the Woodland Trust’s Jubilee Woodland scheme. Since that time more have been added .  Most of these although still small, are thriving and from time to time we add some slightly more mature trees.

Small Copper Rixton 25th August 2013-20_008

SMALL COPPER BUTTERFLY A GRASSLAND SPECIES ONE OF THE CREATURES TO BENEFIT FROM THE HABITAT – PHOTO PETE ASTLES

The site has the benefit of a public footpath running through it and additional tracks have been trodden between the trees. These are already being well used. We have had a visit from a Lancashire Wildlife Trust representative who advised us on the maintenance and ecology of the site.

The woodland has been planted as a facility for the people of the area and an investment in the future and it is a great pleasure to see it being well used.

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